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TOUS LES ARTICLES :

LE DERNIER N°
• THE GNAOUA
• ARAB-ANDALUSIAN MUSIC
• HISTORY OF A RELIGION

GUIDO N° 45
• TOWARDS CAPE SIM
• DAR SOLTAN AND BORJ EL OUED
• SHELL FISHING
• THE LMAHALOU SPRING

GUIDO N° 44
• THE ZAOUÏAS
• DOORS HAVE THEIR SECRETS
• DATES AND PALM TREES

GUIDO N° 43
• THE TOWNS OF ESSAOUIRA AND SAINT-MALO: TWIN SISTERS OR MIRROR IMAGES OF EACH OTHER ?
• RAFFIA CRAFT MIRO : AN EXCEPTIONAL DESIGNER
• SAFI COASTAL ROAD KASBAH HAMIDOUCH, AGOUZ, SOUIRA KÉDIMA

GUIDO N° 42
• ETERNAL MAGIC YESTERYEAR MEMORIES TODAY’S IMPRESSIONS - !!!!!
• THE SYNAGOGUE SLAT LKALHAL
• SPICES

GUIDO N° 41
• ESSAOUIRA: « A WORLD WITHIN A TOWN »
• THE NATIONAL TEA MUSEUM IN ESSAOUIRA, A CHINESE AND MOROCCAN PARTNERSHIP
• ESSAOUIRA AND ITS REGION ENHANCED BY THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ARGAN TREE
• A TOP QUALITY SARDINE

GUIDO N° 40
• UNIQUE MODEL SHIPS IN THE MEDINA!
• AN OUTSTANDING ARGAN TREE! YES, BUT WHY?
• THE DROMEDARY CAMEL AND THE BACTRIAN CAMEL
• LEMONS AND THEIR PROPERTIES

GUIDO N° 39
• EDITO N° 39
• MOULAY HASSAN SQUARE
• BREATHE, SWIM AND MOVE AROUND: SUMMER IS HERE!
• THE GNAOUA AND THE FESTIVAL

GUIDO N° 38
• THE ATTIA SYNAGOGUE: A FUTURE MUSEUM OF JUDAISM?
• THE RETURN OF THE BALD IBIS OR GERONTICUS EREMITA
• AÏN AHJAR OR THE « SOURCE FROM THE ROCKS »

GUIDO N° 37
• PUBLIC LETTER-WRITERS, A LONG LASTING TRADE!!
• THE INLAYERS’ COOPERATIVE
• THE MENZEH (OR WAREHOUSE)
• YENNAYER OR BERBER NEW YEAR OR AMAZIGH
• THE BRIDAL VEIL BROOM OR « BILOUGUI »

GUIDO N° 36
• THE PORTUGUESE CHURCH & THE DANISH CONSULATE
• ELEONORA’S FALCON
• FROM ESSAOUIRA TO SIDI KAOUKI DUNES, DESERTED BEACHES AND FISHERMEN’S VILLAGES

GUIDO N° 35
• REED CRAFTSMEN
• SAFI : THE MEDINA AND THE MARABOUT ALONG THE COAST
• TOWN ZAPPING
• THE TRAVELLER’S TREE OR RAVENALA MADAGASCARIENSIS

GUIDO N° 34
• THE SLAT LAKLHAL SYNAGOGUE
• THE DONKEY: NOT SO STUBBORN!

GUIDO N° 33
• ORGANIC HORSEHAIR : AN OLD STORY!
• FROM OLIVE TO OIL ! : ZITOUN, ZITOUNA, ZIT…
• BLACK OLIVE JAM
• THE TRACKS AROUND SIDI KAOUKI

GUIDO N° 32
• BEACONS AND SEA MARKS : REFERENCE POINTS FOR SAILORS
• WELL BEING CENTRES
• SAFI

GUIDO N° 31
• GNAOUA AND WORLD MUSIC
• A NEW LIFE FOR THE INDUSTRIAL ZONE?
• AZEMMOUR
• THE TAZOTA
• GATHERED IN THE PAPERS AS DAYS WENT BY

GUIDO N° 30
• ESSAOUIRA, THE « EVER-CHANGING »
• THE CAFÉ-HÔTEL AABDI AND THE AABDA TRIBE
• WATCHTOWER-MOUCHARABIEH-PEEPHOLE
• GREEN TOURISM IN IDA OUGOURD
• IN-CITY ZAPPING

GUIDO N° 29
• THE CLOCK
• LA FIXATION DES DUNES À ESSAOUIRA
• THE WATIER STATION - MOULAY BOUZERKTOUN
• BEAUTY SECRETS FROM MOROCCAN WOMEN
• TOWN ZAPPING

GUIDO N° 28
• FESTIVAL OF THE ATLANTIC ANDALUSIAS 2010
• TOWN CHECK
• PARADISE VALLEY

GUIDO N° 27
• THE WOOL SOUK IN ESSAOUIRA, A VANISHING ACTIVITY
• REHABILITATION OF THE ESSAOUIRA MELLAH AND OF THE SCALA AREA
• TAGENZA AND GARA GARA

GUIDO N° 26
• EDITO N° 26
• FLOODING, THE BRIDGES OF DIABET
• THE ZERRAR DAM
• SIDI MOGDUL
• OUALIDIA OR WALIDIA

GUIDO N° 25
• ALICE’S LOOKING GLASS : IOSU URIZ
• THE SOAPS OF MOGADOR

• HAMMAM AND SPA
• ITINERARY IN THE RED TOWN

GUIDO N° 24
• STREET ART
• THE ARGAN OIL FROM SIDI YASSINE
• A TOUR TO NEKNAFA AND ITS « SPA »

GUIDO N° 23
• LOGBOOK ENTRIES : MEMORIES OF THE PORT
• THE SQALAS
• THE WATER
• A TOUR OF THE COASTLINE AROUND ESSAOUIRA

GUIDO N° 22

GUIDO N° 13
• EDITO N° 13

Guido : 37 - YENNAYER OR BERBER NEW YEAR OR AMAZIGH

On next January 12th, the Berber people will celebrate Yennayer and enter the year 2693.

Yennayer is the only non Muslim feast shared by all the people in North Africa. In each part of the region, it will be the opportunity for various festivities and family gatherings around a special meal.

Yennayer is the feast when the Imazighen (or “free men”) celebrate the coming New Year. Like other civilisations in the world (Russian, Chinese, Irish, Arabic etc.) the Imazighen did have their own ancient calendar, based on both the changing of seasons, the different cycles in the vegetation that determine vital agricultural times and on the positions of stars like the Moon and the Sun.

For the Imazighen, Yennayer first means a gate that opens onto a new year and it is called “tabburt useggwass” (gate of the year). Its celebration is explained by the importance given to the rituals and superstitions of the time that still exist in part nowadays. This very time of year is particularly singled out as this season corresponds to the shortage of the food supplies that were kept over the winter. It is important then to renew one’s spiritual strength by calling on the rituals: at this time of year, the ritual has to symbolize abundance.
In order for the new coming year to be more fruitful and the land more fertile, it is thus necessary to purify oneself and to clean all places. Ritual laws such as the sacrifice of an animal (Asfel) at the beginning of the year are still complied with and nowadays this ritual is still used to bless the foundations of a new building.

The Asfel ritual symbolizes expelling evil forces and malevolent spirits to make room for the benevolent spirits that will assist people the whole year round. If people can afford it, they will sacrifice as many animals as there are members in the family. Tradition requires the sacrifice of a rooster per man, a hen per woman and both for pregnant women so as not to forget the future baby.
If meat is lacking, every member of the family will be symbolized by an egg topping a crown of pasta.

Dinner on that night will be served late and in order to foresee a fruitful year according to the Imazighen, the meal will have to be very copious; the meat from the slaughtered animal will be served according to the rites.

People with little means who cannot afford such sacrifices will serve dry meat instead, like “acedluh”, that has been stored for such occasions. During dinner, a ceremony will be performed so as to protect absent people and to insure a good coming year. Absent people will not be forgotten: spoons will be placed by the mother to symbolize their presence and a small portion of food will be left for them in the collective dish that is supposed to represent the strength of the whole family.

After the meal, it is fitting to check if everybody has eaten one’s fill: it is the mistress of the household (the grandmother or the mother) who asks the children if their have eaten their fill. The reply is “becqua neswa” (yes we ate and we are full). The mistress of the household does not forget questioning either relatives or neighbours who in turn offer different foods: it is not customary to leave any dish empty on the day of “laâwacher” (blessed day).

The feast lingers on the days following the ritual: the nuts stored or bought the rest of the year like dried figs, almonds, hazelnuts, dates etc. will also be offered to the guests.

On this occasion and in order to celebrate the Berber culture, the A.F.M.E. will open the first Amazigh Festival on January the 17th in partnership with Essaouira Cultural delegation